Podcast Poverty Research & Policy Podcast
 2016 Episodes

Hosted by David Chancellor

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Past episodes: 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | UW–Madison's iTunes U


Measuring the Effects of SNAP on Obesity (November 2016)

Lorenzo Almada

In this podcast, Lorenzo Almada of Columbia University talks about a recent paper he co-wrote with Rusty Tchernis that examines whether SNAP, or food stamps, could lead to increased obesity among people that use the program.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Understanding Poverty and Inequality in the 21st Century (October 2016)

Steven Durlauf

In this podcast, economist Steven Durlauf of the University of Wisconsin–Madison discusses how contemporary poverty and inequality in the United States are qualitatively different now than at the beginning of the War on Poverty. In light of these differences, he points to key areas of research and policy that may be helpful in responding to poverty and disadvantage in the 21st century.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Do the Labels We Use for Public Benefit Programs Matter? (September 2016)

Tim Beatty

In this podcast, economist Tim Beatty of the University of California, Davis talks about an article he co-wrote with Charlotte Tuttle about the SNAP or food stamps program and what happened to people's spending when there was a sudden increase in the program benefit. Beatty says the answer can tell us something about whether the labels we use for public benefit programs influence how people spend their money.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

The Suburbanization of U.S. Poverty (August 2016)

In this podcast, Scott Allard, a Professor at the University of Washington's Evan's School of Public Affairs, discusses his new research on the growth of suburban poverty in the United States and the resource challenges this can create for suburban municipalities and social service providers.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Paternal Incarceration: What Can We Learn Based on Evidence from a Danish Policy Shock? (July 2016)

Christopher Wildeman

In this podcast, Christopher Wildeman, an Associate Professor of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University discusses his findings from a study about paternal incarceration and children's risk of being charged as an adult based on evidence from a Danish policy shock.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

The Costs of Monetary Legal Sanctions for the Poor (June 2016)

Alexes Harris

In this podcast, Alexes Harris, a sociologist at the University of Washington, talks about work from her June 2016 book Pound of Flesh: Monetary Legal Sanctions as Punishment for the Poor.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Reassessing the Evidence on the Rising Costs of Child Care (May 2016)

Christ Herbst

In this podcast, Chris Herbst of Arizona State University discusses his research on changes in the cost of child care in the United States in recent decades. Despite reports of skyrocketing child care costs, Herbst finds that child care costs have been essentially flat since around 2000 and that there has been a noticeable divergence in the quality of child care that low- and high-income parents purchase for their children.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Vetting and Letting: Cohabiting Stepfamily Formation for Low-Income Black Families (April 2016)

Megan Reid

Our April 2016 podcast features IRP National Poverty Fellow Megan Reid discussing her research on cohabiting stepfamily formation among low-income black families in the Bronx and, in particular, the ways in which mothers engage in deliberative vetting of potential partners before allowing them to move in.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

The Tax War on Poverty (March 2016)

Susannah Camic Tahk

In this podcast, law professor Susannah Camic Tahk discusses the growth in U.S. antipoverty programs that are administered through the tax code and what it means for the politics of these programs, how they're administered, and the types of problems that they raise.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Does Child Medicaid Access Improve Long-Term Educational Outcomes? (February 2016)

Our February 2016 podcast features Lincoln Groves, who is a postdoctoral scholar in the National Poverty Fellows Program, talking about his research on how increased Child Medicaid access in the 1980s and early 1990s may have led to improved high school graduation rates.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

How Did the Safety Net Support Kids with Unemployed Parents during the Great Recession? (January 2016)

In this podcast, Urban Institute Senior Fellow and IRP visiting scholar Julia Isaacs talks about the effectiveness of safety net supports for low-income children with an unemployed parent during the Great Recession.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac