Podcast

IRP Podcasts

Hosted by David Chancellor.

Listen to our podcast on UW–Madison's iTunes U.

Disparities in the Negative Consequences of Drinking by Race, Ethnicity, and Poverty Status (September 2014)

Joe Glass

In this podcast, Joe Glass of UW–Madison's School of Social Work discusses results from his study that examines disparities in the effects of alcohol consumption by race, ethnicity, and poverty status.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Kids, Marriage, and Work: Behavioral Decisions Around the EITC (August 2014)

Sarah Halpern-Meekin

In this podcast, IRP affiliate Sarah Halpern-Meekin talks about her research on how recipients of the Earned Income Tax Credit understand and respond to the incentives of the EITC, especially regarding decisions about childbearing, marriage, and earnings.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

The Prospects for Second-Generation Latino Young Men in the Inner City Maria Rendon
(July 2014)

In this podcast, Maria Rendón of UC-Irvine discusses findings from her qualitative study of second-generation Latino young men in urban neighborhoods and their attitudes about getting ahead in the United States.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Criminal Punishment and American Inequality (June 2014)

Christopher Uggen

The U.S. prison population has expanded significantly over the last three decades. In this podcast, University of Minnesota sociologist Christopher Uggen talks about the links between crime, punishment, and inequality and discusses how the criminal justice system can mediate transitions in and out of poverty and adult social roles.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Fathering after Deployment (May 2014)

Tova Walsh

In this podcast, Dr. Tova Walsh talks about the reunification process for fathers of young children returning from military deployment as they transition back into family roles. While reunification can be a very happy time, it can also be challenging as military fathers face parenting and relationship stresses alongside stress related to their deployments. Additionally, deactivated soldiers often experience a drop in pay and rates of unemployment that are higher than for their civilian peers, which may lead to economic strain for these families. The podcast is based on a study that Walsh and her coauthors published in the February 2014 issue of Health and Social Work and features discussion of the struggles returning servicemen experience in reconnecting to their partners and their young children.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Using Insights from Participatory Research to Inform Poverty Policy (April 2014)

Marianna Chilton

In this podcast, Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger Free Communities and associate professor at the Drexel University School of Public Health, talks about doing participatory research and the lessons this type of work can offer.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Reconsidering the Effects of Immigration on the U.S. Labor Market (March 2014)

Giovanni Peri

In this podcast, Giovanni Peri of UC–Davis talks about the need for nuance when considering the effects of immigration on the domestic labor market. While many fear that immigrants will drive down wages or increase native-born unemployment, Peri says there is more to the picture, including geographic concentration and wide variation in skill levels among immigrants. Ultimately, Peri says that to really evaluate the impact of immigration, it's important to understand the margins of adjustment that happen within a local economy.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Undocumented Young Adults in the United States and the 'Transition from Belonging to Illegality' (February 2014)Roberto G. Gonzales

Following a 1982 Supreme Court decision, children that arrived in the United States with their undocumented parents were granted full access to the K–12 school system. However, with pathways towards citizenship—and, thus, work, drivers' licenses, voting, and post-secondary education—severely limited, these young people transition toward fewer and fewer rights as they near their 18th birthday. In this podcast, Roberto Gonzales of the Harvard Graduate School of Education talks about his work with these undocumented young people and the implications that immigration policy changes might hold for them.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Low-Income Mothers and Distrust (January 2014)

Judith Levine

Judith Levine of Temple University talks about her recently released book Ain't No Trust: How Bosses, Boyfriends, and Bureaucrats Fail Low-Income Mothers and Why It Matters. In the podcast, Levine explains how low-income mothers experience more than their share of distrust and how that distrust serves as a form of inequality. In Levine's work, she finds that much of this distrust develops from often-negative social interactions with employers, government workers, and people in the women's social networks. The distrust that develops out of those interactions can undermine policy and serve as a barrier that keeps these mothers from pursuing better opportunities.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Administrative Burden and Access to Government Programs (December 2013)

Donald MoynihanPamela Herd

Pam Herd and Don Moynihan discuss their work on red tape—or administrative burden—and how it affects the way that people access government social welfare programs. They discuss potential benefits of shifting administrative burden from program participants to the program administrators and how improving program implementation can alter the way that people perceive government and civically engage. For more informatin on this topic see their La Follette School Working Paper No. 2013-013.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Natural Disasters, the Poor, and the Louisiana Road Home Program (September 2013)

Jesse Gregory

Jesse Gregory, assistant professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the Louisiana Road Home Program and its effect on helping low-income homeowners rebuild after Hurricane Katrina. He also talks about the challenges of creating policy that balances the need to help disaster victims recover while not encouraging further building in disaster-locations.

To learn more about Gregory's work on this topic, please see his working paper The Impact of Post-Katrina Rebuilding Grants on the Resettlement Choices of New Orleans Homeowners

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

The Wisconsin Poverty Report and How We Think about Measuring Poverty (July 2013)

Timothy Smeeding

Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty and Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs, talks about the latest Wisconsin Poverty Report, released in June of 2013. Smeeding says that poverty in Wisconsin increased modestly between 2010 and 2011 and that the state saw a statistically significant increase in child poverty, mostly a result of changes in refundable tax credits. The podcast explains the differences between the Wisconsin Poverty Measure and the official federal poverty measure and looks at how a better understanding of how we define poverty can have an effect on our understanding of who is poor.

For technical details behind the reports, or to see previous years' reports, please see the Wisconsin Poverty Report page on the IRP website.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Family Change, Father Involvement, and Child Food Insecurity (June 2013)

Daniel P. Miller

In this podcast, Daniel Miller of the Boston University School of Social Work discusses his research on measuring child food insecurity in the context of family type, changing family structure, and father involvement. Miller says there's still a lot that we don't know about food insecurity for kids but that understanding the connections between family change and food insecurity has a lot of promise in giving us a better picture of the problem.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Thinking about Decision Making in the Context of Poverty (May 2013)

Crystal Hall

In this podcast, Crystal Hall of the University of Washington Evans School of Public Affairs talks about her work applying insights from behavioral and cognitive psychology to better understand the decision making of people living in the context of poverty. Hall explains how the operating assumptions of programs and services might not do a good job at taking account of the many tradeoffs that people with fewer material resources have to make.

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Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Evaluating the Post-Katrina New Orleans School System (April 2013)

Douglas N. Harris

Douglas Harris, associate professor of economics and University Endowed Chair in Public Education at Tulane University in New Orleans, talks about the development of the charter school system in New Orleans coming out of Hurricane Katrina. He explains some of the likely hypotheses for why New Orleans' schools might be doing better and discusses the challenges of measuring improvement in the city's schools.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Music is from "Stormy Blues" by Arne Bang Huseby under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

The Employment Prospects of Formerly Incarcerated People and Off-the-Books Work (February 2013)

Bryan Sykes

Bryan Sykes, a sociologist at DePaul University, explains some of the barriers that former inmates encounter when trying to find work and how the costs of incarceration disproportionately affect young African American men. He also talks about his work on off-the-books labor and how former inmates still face heavy discrimination in the informal economy.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Intro Music is from "Stormy Blues" by Arne Bang Huseby under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

The EITC and Tax Refunds for Low-Income Tax Filers (December 2012)

Damon Jones

Damon Jones, an economist at the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy, talks about how the EITC and other refundable tax credits can combine to create a large once-a-year lump sum payment for low-income tax filers and how that payment structure affects the ways that those funds are used.*

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Multiple-Partner Fertility and Disadvantaged Families (November 2012)

Marcy Carlson

Marcy Carlson, professor of sociology at UW–Madison, talks about parents having kids with more than one partner and how this can be a challenge for families and for policymakers.

For more on this topic, please see Professor Carlson's webcast presentation at the Population Reference Bureau.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

The Balance Sheets of Low-Income People (October 2012)

J. Michael Collins

J. Michael Collins, director of the Center for Financial Security, explains some of the efforts behind getting more low-income people to save money and talks about the challenges in developing good policy and helpful financial products for the underbanked population.

For more on this, check out the following links:

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Mmusic is "Entropical Paradise" performed by Alchemeleon.

Spatial measurement of child poverty in the United States (September 2012)

Katherine Curtis

Katherine Curtis of University of Wisconsin–Madison's Department of Community and Environmental Sociology talks about developing spatial measurements of poverty and how it is critical to consider locally specific factors when trying to understand the drivers of poverty and child poverty.*

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Food security trends and an introduction to the Wisconsin Food Security Project (August 2012)

Judi Bartfeld

Judi Bartfeld, director of the IRP-USDA RIDGE Center, professor with the Department of Consumer Science, and specialist with the University of Wisconsin–Extension, discusses the growth in food insecurity following the Great Recession, measurement methods, and the development of the Wisconsin Food Security Project website.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Income volatility trends in the United States and their potential impact on the poor (July 2012)

Bradley Hardy

In July's podcast, Bradley Hardy of American University talks about trends in U.S. income volatility and how shifts towards greater volatility can particularly impact low-income people.

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Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Can behavioral economics contribute to poverty research? (June 2012)

Justin Sydnor

Justin Sydnor, a microeconomist at the Wisconsin School of Business, talks about the growing field of behavioral economics and how it can be applied to research on poverty and the problems facing low-wage workers.*

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Measuring unmet food need in San Francisco and Marin County (May 2012)

Christopher Wimer

In IRP's first podcast, Dave talks with Christopher Wimer of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality about Wimer's work on measuring unmet food need in San Francisco and Marin County, California.*

Listen to the podcast

*Music is from "Commuting (Other Version)" by So Cow.