Poverty-Related Courses Taught by IRP Affiliates

IRP affiliates at the University of Wisconsin–Madison teach a range of undergraduate and graduate poverty-related courses. A sampling of courses is provided below. The following list is provided as an example of course offerings; not all courses are available every semester or year. Please consult the UW–Madison timetable for current course listings.

Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Courses with Poverty and Policy Perspectives

Many of IRP's on-campus affiliates teach large classes of undergraduates during the academic year that focus on poverty- and inequality-related issues. Examples of courses taught this fall include the following:

  • Sociology 578, "Poverty and Place," taught by Leann Tigges, presents a sociological overview of place-based poverty in the United States, concentrating on the economic structure of poor places and the characteristics of the people who live in those places. The course has an emphasis on persistently poor rural regions and communities, analysis of selected minority groups and their poverty statuses, and poverty programs and their consequences for structural and cultural changes.
  • School of Human Ecology 535, "A Family Perspective in Policymaking," taught by Sarah Halpern-Meekin, will explore the relationship between family functioning and public/private policies at the local, state and federal levels; analyze the consequences of issues, policies or programs on family well-being; and, examine roles for professionals in influencing policy development.

Multidisciplinary Graduate Courses with Poverty and Policy Perspectives

Many of IRP's on-campus affiliates teach classes of graduates during the academic year that focus on poverty- and inequality-related issues. For example, during the current semester, graduate course offerings include:

  • Economics 968, "Workshop on Public Economics," taught by John Karl Scholz, is designed for individual research and group discussion of public expenditure programs with attention to investment in human capital, education, training, health information, and welfare programs. The workshop includes reports on research in progress by students, staff, and visiting scholars.
  • Public Affairs 878, "Public Management," taught by Donald Moynihan, seeks to (1) help deepen students' appreciation of the importance of public management in our democratic scheme of governance; (2) enhance students' ability to think analytically about problems of public management; and (3) enhance students' ability to make good arguments concerning how public management issues might be addressed.