Emerging Scholars Extramural Small Grant Program

About the Emerging Scholars Extramural Small Grant Program

IRP's Emerging Scholars Small Grant Program, introduced in January 2012, is an important component of the Institute's training and mentoring activities as a National Poverty Research Center supported by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The program, which provides funding of up to $20,000 each for junior scholars whose proposed research is aligned with IRP's research priorities, is designed to support multiple goals. It encourages research in identified priority areas (see below) by directly funding projects in the area and by encouraging discussion on related topics at the IRP Summer Research Workshop. It also contributes to mentoring poverty scholars, as grant recipients benefit from consultation with senior affiliates and, during the workshops, with other senior poverty scholars.

The three research-priority areas for the small grant program are: Family Complexity, Poverty, and Public Policy; Building Human Capital and Economic Potential; and Promising Programs to Reduce Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty. Each area is briefly described below with links to the Requests for Proposals and winning-proposal abstracts.

Promising Programs to Reduce Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty

The 2014–2016 Emerging Scholars program will focus on the effectiveness of policies and programs in reducing the intergenerational transmission of poverty from parents to children.

Request for Proposals | Focal Theme and Questions of Interest | Awarded Research Grants

Building Human Capital and Economic Potential

The 2012–2014 Emerging Scholars program focuses on how policies and programs can build economic self-sufficiency by increasing employment, wages, labor market skills, and earnings. It is being coordinated by Timothy Smeeding, Arts & Sciences Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs at the La Follette School of Public Affairs, and Carolyn Heinrich, Sid Richardson Professor of Public Affairs, Affiliated Professor of Economics, and Director of the Center for Health and Social Policy, University of Texas at Austin, and IRP affiliate.

Request for Proposals | Focal Theme and Questions of Interest | Awarded Research Grants

Family Complexity, Poverty, and Public Policy

The 2012–2013 Emerging Scholars program focuses on the relationship of family complexity to poverty and public policy, and is being coordinated by University of Wisconsin–Madison scholars and IRP affiliates Marcia (Marcy) Carlson, Professor of Sociology and affiliate of the Center for Demography and Ecology, and Daniel R. Meyer, Mary C. Jacoby Distinguished Professor of School of Social Work.

Request for Proposals | Focal Theme and Questions of Interest | Awarded Research Grants

Acknowledgment and Disclaimer

Funding for the IRP Emerging Scholars Program was made possible in part by grant number AE00102-02 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), which was awarded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The views expressed in publications resulting from supported research do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Program support is subject to the availability of funds. Nothing in this description of applications should be construed as committing IRP to dividing available funds among all qualified applicants.