Podcast

IRP Podcasts – 2014

Hosted by David Chancellor.

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Genetics and the Reproduction of Poverty (December 2014)

Dalton ConleyIn this podcast, New York University Professor Dalton Conley talks about how advances in the availability of genomic data can potentially inform the study of intergenerational poverty and inequality.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Does discrimination lead to differences in parenting practices? (November 2014)

Owen Thompson

In this podcast, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee economist Owen Thompson talks about his research that examines how parenting practices changed among southern African Americans relative to their experiences during the civil rights era.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac

Roles and Resources in Complex Families (October 2014)

Lawrence Berger

In this podcast, IRP Director Lawrence Berger discusses the challenges that families with multipartner fertility or complexity encounter when it comes to determining roles and dividing resources like time, money, and public benefits across multiple households or family groups.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Disparities in the Negative Consequences of Drinking by Race, Ethnicity, and Poverty Status (September 2014)

Joe Glass

In this podcast, Joe Glass of UW–Madison's School of Social Work discusses results from his study that examines disparities in the effects of alcohol consumption by race, ethnicity, and poverty status.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Kids, Marriage, and Work: Behavioral Decisions Around the EITC (August 2014)

Sarah Halpern-Meekin

In this podcast, IRP affiliate Sarah Halpern-Meekin talks about her research on how recipients of the Earned Income Tax Credit understand and respond to the incentives of the EITC, especially regarding decisions about childbearing, marriage, and earnings.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

The Prospects for Second-Generation Latino Young Men in the Inner City Maria Rendon
(July 2014)

In this podcast, Maria Rendón of UC-Irvine discusses findings from her qualitative study of second-generation Latino young men in urban neighborhoods and their attitudes about getting ahead in the United States.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Criminal Punishment and American Inequality (June 2014)

Christopher Uggen

The U.S. prison population has expanded significantly over the last three decades. In this podcast, University of Minnesota sociologist Christopher Uggen talks about the links between crime, punishment, and inequality and discusses how the criminal justice system can mediate transitions in and out of poverty and adult social roles.

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Music is from "Test Drive" by Zapac.

Fathering after Deployment (May 2014)

Tova Walsh

In this podcast, Dr. Tova Walsh talks about the reunification process for fathers of young children returning from military deployment as they transition back into family roles. While reunification can be a very happy time, it can also be challenging as military fathers face parenting and relationship stresses alongside stress related to their deployments. Additionally, deactivated soldiers often experience a drop in pay and rates of unemployment that are higher than for their civilian peers, which may lead to economic strain for these families. The podcast is based on a study that Walsh and her coauthors published in the February 2014 issue of Health and Social Work and features discussion of the struggles returning servicemen experience in reconnecting to their partners and their young children.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Using Insights from Participatory Research to Inform Poverty Policy (April 2014)

Marianna Chilton

In this podcast, Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger Free Communities and associate professor at the Drexel University School of Public Health, talks about doing participatory research and the lessons this type of work can offer.

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Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Reconsidering the Effects of Immigration on the U.S. Labor Market (March 2014)

Giovanni Peri

In this podcast, Giovanni Peri of UC–Davis talks about the need for nuance when considering the effects of immigration on the domestic labor market. While many fear that immigrants will drive down wages or increase native-born unemployment, Peri says there is more to the picture, including geographic concentration and wide variation in skill levels among immigrants. Ultimately, Peri says that to really evaluate the impact of immigration, it's important to understand the margins of adjustment that happen within a local economy.

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Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Undocumented Young Adults in the United States and the 'Transition from Belonging to Illegality' (February 2014)Roberto G. Gonzales

Following a 1982 Supreme Court decision, children that arrived in the United States with their undocumented parents were granted full access to the K–12 school system. However, with pathways towards citizenship—and, thus, work, drivers' licenses, voting, and post-secondary education—severely limited, these young people transition toward fewer and fewer rights as they near their 18th birthday. In this podcast, Roberto Gonzales of the Harvard Graduate School of Education talks about his work with these undocumented young people and the implications that immigration policy changes might hold for them.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.

Low-Income Mothers and Distrust (January 2014)

Judith Levine

Judith Levine of Temple University talks about her recently released book Ain't No Trust: How Bosses, Boyfriends, and Bureaucrats Fail Low-Income Mothers and Why It Matters. In the podcast, Levine explains how low-income mothers experience more than their share of distrust and how that distrust serves as a form of inequality. In Levine's work, she finds that much of this distrust develops from often-negative social interactions with employers, government workers, and people in the women's social networks. The distrust that develops out of those interactions can undermine policy and serve as a barrier that keeps these mothers from pursuing better opportunities.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Music is from "High Instrumental Mix" by Pete Smith.