University of Wisconsin–Madison

Professional Development Training Series on Poverty and Economic Mobility Research 2022–2023 Call for Applications – Due 5/17/2022

Application Deadline: 11:59 p.m. CDT Tuesday, May 17, 2022

View/download PDF version of the Call

About The Training Series

As the National Research Center on Poverty and Economic Mobility, the Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison invites applications from continuing Ph.D. and master’s degree students who are from groups that are underrepresented in academia for its 2022–2023 Professional Development Training Series on Poverty and Economic Mobility Research. IRP also encourages applications from students attending universities that are not designated as a R1 “very high research activity” by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. This training series is provided with the financial support of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Human Services Policy (U.S. DHHS/ASPE/HSP).

IRP is offering this virtual quarterly training series from fall 2022 through summer 2023 to 10 students. Awardees will receive a stipend of $500 for their participation.

The series was established to support the career development of in-residents fellows working at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through programs administered by IRP including the National Poverty Fellows (NPF) program for postdoctoral researchers and the Economic Mobility Fellows (EMF) program for policy analysts who have recently completed their master’s degree, as well as IRP’s National Dissertation and IRP Dissertation awardees. It is designed to increase researchers’ (1) interdisciplinary knowledge and understanding of policy-relevant research contexts including the policymaking processes in federal agencies that administer human services programs; (2) ability to communicate with policy and public audiences effectively; (3) ability to work with affected communities in research development and dissemination; and (4) knowledge about research career paths outside of academia. The two-hour workshops will cover a variety of topics identified by HHS and the trainees as important to their development, including topics such as the role of HHS in federal policy, effective strategies for engaging affected communities in the research process, data visualization and infographics, communicating for policy audiences, ensuring an equity lens in communications, and research careers in policy settings.

About IRP

The Institute for Research on Poverty is a center for interdisciplinary research into the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality in the United States and the impacts of related policies and programs.

As the National Research Center on Poverty & Economic Mobility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, IRP coordinates the U.S. Collaborative of Poverty Centers (CPC). IRP and its partner centers support and train poverty and economic mobility scholars with a special focus on expanding opportunities for scholars from historically underrepresented groups. In addition, IRP and its partner centers provide relevant, cutting-edge research on a wide range of topics with the ultimate goal of improving the effectiveness of public policies to reduce poverty and its consequences.

About Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Office of Human Services Policy (HSP)

The Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation is the principal advisor to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on policy development. ASPE is responsible for major activities in policy coordination, legislation development, strategic planning, policy research, evaluation, and economic analysis. Within ASPE, the Office of Human Services Policy (HSP) conducts policy research, analysis, evaluation, and coordination on various issues across the Department, including but not limited to, poverty and measurement, marginalized communities, early childhood education and child welfare, family strengthening, economic support for families, and youth development. HSP serves as a liaison with other agencies on broad economic matters and is the Department’s lead on poverty research and analysis.

HSP is focused on human services programs and their ability to promote the economic and social well-being of many of America’s most marginalized people. Through a variety of programs, services, and benefits administered at the federal, state, local, and community levels, the field of human services provides a range of resources to best support the complex needs of a variety of America’s lower income families and individuals.

To learn more about ASPE/HSP and the work they do, watch this video.

Terms

Eligibility

Proposals are invited from individuals who will be enrolled in a Ph.D. or master’s degree program in the 2022-2023 academic year at a U.S. university. Note that students must have completed their first year of their program before the start of the 2022-2023 academic year.

To be eligible, applicants must either belong to a group that is underrepresented in academia or attend a university that is not designated as a R1 “very high research activity” by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education. IRP is using the definition of underrepresented as outlined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Underrepresentation can exist in various forms, from one’s race or ethnicity, to ability status, gender identity or sexual orientation, or current or past economic disadvantage. Applicants will be asked to share relevant demographic data in their application and describe how they meet the NIH definition of underrepresented in their field of study.

Students must show a demonstrated interest pursuing a research career focused on issues related to poverty, economic mobility, equity, inclusion, diversity, and access in human services.

University of Wisconsin–Madison graduate students are ineligible for this training series.

Contract Period

The training series will run from fall 2022 through summer 2023. We expect to hold the four two-hour virtual trainings on Friday afternoons eastern time (ET) with one training per calendar quarter. The schedule will be set by the end of summer 2022.

Funding

Selected students will receive a $500 stipend to participate in the virtual trainings.

Commitment

Receipt of this stipend from IRP will require a commitment to attend and actively engage in four two-hour virtual trainings provided on a quarterly basis from fall 2022 to summer 2023.

Selection Process

Applications will be reviewed as follows.

  1. Applications will be screened for completeness and eligibility:
    1. online application completed;
    2. application materials uploaded;
    3. applicant is a member of a group unrepresented in academia and/or is attending a non-R1 institution; and
    4. applicant is expected to be a continuing Ph.D. or master’s degree student at a U.S. university in the 2022-2023 academic year.
  2. Qualifying applications will be scored by IRP faculty and staff based on the following criteria:
    1. demonstrated interest in pursuing a research career focused on issues related to poverty, economic mobility, equity, inclusion, diversity, and access in human services;
    2. compelling description on how this training series will advance the applicant’s career goals; and
    3. the applicant’s record of scholarly engagement and potential for scholarly achievement, taking into account the relative advantages and constraints on resources over the course of the applicant’s graduate education.

Award Info

IRP anticipates selecting up to 10 students for the 2022–2023 academic year. Awards will be made in late June 2022.

Application Instructions

Submit application via the online Application Form. Applicants should fill out the application materials and provide the materials outlined below as one PDF file, in the order listed, by the application deadline. Your application should include:

  1. A letter of interest (no more than two single-spaced pages) that:
    1. describes your poverty research interests, as well as your professional goals in this area, progress toward them, and accomplishments to date;
    2. specifies the status of your studies in the 2022-2023 academic year (e.g., pre-dissertator Ph.D. student or second year master’s degree student) and how your scholarly and career development will be aided by this training particularly at this stage of your education.
  2. Current resume or curriculum vitae.
  3. Transcripts (from graduate degree program; will accept unofficial transcripts)

Contact

All inquiries, including questions on the application process, should be directed to irpapply@ssc.wisc.edu

Timeline

Call Release April 12, 2022
Application Deadline May 17, 2022
Notification Late June 2022
Training Dates Exact dates to be determined; anticipate four two-hour meetings on Friday afternoons beginning in fall 2022 and going through summer 2023