Student Homelessness

New study finds that 4.2 million kids experience homelessness each year, By Leila Fadel, November 15, 2017, National Public Radio: “Marquan Ellis was evicted from his home in Las Vegas, Nevada when he was 18. His mother battled with a drug and gambling addiction while he stayed at his godmother’s house. But he couldn’t stay there forever. He found his way to the Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth where he enrolled in the independent living program…”

Youth Homelessness

A hidden population: Youth homelessness is on the rise, By Teresa Wiltz, July 7, 2017, Stateline: “They are the nation’s invisible homeless population, undercounted for years, hiding out in cars and abandoned buildings, in motels and on couches, often trading sex for a place to sleep. And now, for a complex variety of reasons, the number of youth — teens and young adults — living on the street appears to be growing…”

Youth Homelessness

  • Youth homelessness in Baltimore higher than previously thought, By Colin Campbell, November 30, 2016, Baltimore Sun: “Homelessness among Baltimore youths is much higher than previously thought, according to an Abell Foundation report released Wednesday.  More than 1,400 young people under the age of 25 were unaccompanied by a parent or guardian, without a safe, stable, affordable place to live, according to data collected by homeless advocates, service providers, the University of Maryland, the city and other stakeholders…”
  • City adds beds, services for homeless youth, By Julia Terruso, November 30, 2016, Philadelphia Inquirer: “In response to a rapid increase in youth homelessness, Philadelphia announced Tuesday that it will dedicate $700,000 to pay for additional beds, job training, and employment and counseling support targeting people 18 to 24…”
  • Against all odds — and with a little help — homeless students find a brighter future, By Kyra Gurney, December 2, 2016, Miami Herald: “One month into his senior year of high school, Terrence Nickerson found himself homeless and alone. He had been kicked out of his step-father’s house after an argument and had no money, no nearby family and nowhere to go. After crashing with friends for a month, Nickerson wound up at a homeless shelter in downtown Miami, in a large dormitory where 100 men slept in wall-to-wall bunk beds. For the first week he was there, Nickerson walked from the Chapman Partnership shelter on North Miami Avenue to Miami Jackson Senior High School in Allapattah — over an hour each way…”

Youth Homelessness

Survey reveals factors in youth homelessness, By Jackie Rehwald, November 2, 2016, Springfield News-Leader: “According to a survey of homeless and at-risk youth in Springfield, young people are more likely to be homeless if they have a parent with a drug or alcohol problem; they have witnessed or been a victim of repeated traumas; or they have ever been homeless with their family.  Factors such as mental illness and whether or not the youth uses drugs or alcohol seem ‘important factors, but secondary,’ said Tim Knapp, Missouri State University sociology professor who helped analyze the results of the survey…”

Former Foster Youth and Homelessness

Many Oklahomans, once in foster care, age out and are now homeless, By Sidney Lee, April 18, 2016, Norman Transcript: “Foster children who have ‘aged out’ of the foster care system are one of the underserved populations in Oklahoma when it comes to housing, according to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. The lack of affordable housing in much of Oklahoma especially affects this population group and others who would have difficulties with affordable and appropriate housing even without a shortage…”

Youth Homelessness

Poverty the leading cause of youth homelessness: Study, By Laurie Monsebraaten, April 4, 2016, Toronto Star: “Poverty — not delinquency — is the leading cause of youth homelessness around the world, according to a groundbreaking international study led by a University of Toronto researcher.  The study, published online Monday by JAMA Pediatrics, analyzes research on youth homelessness involving more than 13,500 young people in 24 countries, including Canada and the United States and is believed to be the first of its kind…”

Foster Youth Welcome Centers – Los Angeles, CA

L.A. County is shutting down troubled centers for foster kids with nowhere else to go, By Garrett Therolf, March 1, 2016, Los Angeles Times: “The waiting rooms for foster youths with nowhere else to go opened with great fanfare several years ago. Known as Youth Welcome Centers, they were hailed by Los Angeles County officials as an important way to address the chronic shortage of foster homes, especially for children hardest to place. They were the only facilities in the county system with a no-refusal policy and quickly became a place for youths who would otherwise be homeless. But in the next few days, the county plans to close both of its centers, acknowledging they didn’t work as intended…”

Homeless Youth – New York City

Homeless young people of New York, overlooked and underserved, By Nikita Stewart, February 5, 2016, New York Times: “Hundreds of homeless young people are in plain sight every day in New York City.  They are sitting on the floor at the Port Authority Bus Terminal and charging their phones as if they were college students awaiting a bus home. They are huddled on the sidewalk, hanging out. They sleep on friends’ couches and in strangers’ beds. They stay with ‘Uncle A.C.E.,’ code for the long route of the A train, where they can spend hours unbothered and unnoticed. Mostly, they just blend in, people in their late teens or early 20s, navigating a treacherous path into adulthood…”

Homeless Youth – Los Angeles, CA

L.A. is working to count a hidden population — homeless young people, By Gale Holland, January 26, 2016, Los Angeles Times: “When Marlon Sibrian turned 18 and aged out of the Los Angeles County foster care system, he had nowhere to go. His social worker dropped him off at the door of a Boyle Heights youth shelter. Sibrian’s time there made it easy for him to recognize the homeless young men amid similarly hoodie-clad and beanie-topped individuals at Union Station…”

Homeless College Students

How to help the students with no homes?, By Kelly Field, August 24, 2015, Chronicle of Higher Education: “The scars on Christine Banjo’s arms are still there — faint marks from the bed bugs that bit her when her family was living in a motel room during her high-school years. ‘Battle wounds,’ she calls them: a faded but constant reminder that the college junior has been chronically homeless since she was 7. During the school year, Ms. Banjo, who is 20, lives in the dorms at Norfolk State University. But on summer vacation and during other breaks, she has no set place to go. There’s no room for her in the rooming house where her parents live, so she crashes with friends or sublets space in a cramped apartment. Most days, her only meal is the sandwich and fries she gets during her shift at McDonald’s. She returns there on her days off just to have something to eat…”

Child Homelessness in the US

‘Invisible’ homeless kids challenge states, By Teresa Wiltz, December 03, 2014, Stateline: “Chances are you won’t see one of the nation’s fastest growing homeless populations camped out on a park bench or queuing up at a local shelter. One in 30 of American children is homeless—an all-time high of 2.5 million, according to a new report by the National Center on Family Homelessness (NCFH). But these kids are often invisible, crashing with their families on friends’ couches, sleeping in all-night diners or hopping from motel to motel from week to week. Some states have begun to focus on helping such children, but their efforts are being complicated by the way the federal government counts them…”

Child Homelessness in the US

  • New report: Child homelessness on the rise in US, By David Crary and Lisa Leff (AP), November 17, 2014, ABC News: “The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. Titled ‘America’s Youngest Outcasts,’ the report being issued Monday by the National Center on Family Homelessness calculates that nearly 2.5 million American children were homeless at some point in 2013. The number is based on the Department of Education’s latest count of 1.3 million homeless children in public schools, supplemented by estimates of homeless pre-school children not counted by the DOE…”
  • Child homelessness surges to nearly 2.5 million, By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo, November 17, 2014, Christian Science Monitor: “One out of every 30 children in the United States experiences homelessness at some point during the year. That’s nearly 2.5 million children, up from 1.6 million in 2010, reports The National Center on Family Homelessness in Waltham, Mass., part of the American Institutes for Research…”

LGBT Youth Homelessness

When coming out as gay leads to homelessness, By Krista Ramsey, September 27, 2014, Cincinnati Enquirer: “Dedrick Hall was 17 when he acknowledged to himself that he was bisexual. When he shared his identity with friends, classmates at Elder High School and his two sisters, he found support. Or, at least, acceptance. Then he told his mother. ‘She just didn’t approve at all. She was very upset about the situation. She said, ‘You can’t stay at my house any more. You have to find someplace else to go…'”