Legal Representation in Evictions

Denver landlords tried to evict nearly 8,000 households last year. The success rate largely depended on one factor: attorneys., By Jennifer Brown, September 13, 2017, Denver Post: “Denver landlords tried to evict nearly 8,000 households last year. Their success depended largely on one factor: whether their tenants hired an attorney. And they almost never did. In Denver County eviction court, landlords have an attorney about 90 percent of the time. Tenants, on the other hand, are represented by counsel about 1 percent of the time, according to new research by the Colorado Center on Law and Policy, which reviewed 93,000 eviction filings from 2001 through last year…”

Supportive Housing Program – Denver, CO

Denver initiative would tap $8.7 million from investors to house the homeless, By Jon Murray, January 12, 2016, Denver Post: “Denver officials on Tuesday will unveil long-awaited details of a novel $8.7 million ‘social impact bond’ contract that would draw on private dollars to house and rehabilitate 250 of its most chronically homeless.  In the proposed arrangement, investors providing startup money to the city could earn back as much as $11.7 million — including up to $3 million in bonuses — or they could lose out on full repayment.  It all would depend on how well the program keeps participants out of jail, the emergency room, detox and other costly services in the next five years — saving the city millions of dollars a year. Each client would get housing and a case manager along with mental health or drug counseling, if needed…”

Food Deserts – Denver, CO

Corner stores in NE Denver part of pilot program for food deserts, By Colleen O’Connor, October 14, 2014, Denver Post: “Hip-hop artist Kingpen Ken stops by the Gem Food Mart in his northeast Denver neighborhood on the way to the recording studio, and plunks down two bottles of water and an orange juice on the counter. ‘It’s just better to eat healthy things before you go to the studio,’ he said. ‘It’s better energy for the day. If you eat candy, it’s weird energy all day.’ This colorful corner store, painted orange and lime green, sits at the intersection of East 30th Avenue and Downing Street in the Whittier neighborhood, which is considered a food desert, far from a full-service grocer. It’s one of five corner stores in a pilot program called the Healthy Corner Store Initiative, started in August by the city and county of Denver’s Department of Environmental Health, and funded by a grant of more than $327,000 from the Colorado Health Foundation…”