Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs

Programs that fight teenage pregnancy are at risk of being cut, By Pam Belluck, August 10, 2017, New York Times: “At age 14, Latavia Burton knows something about teenage pregnancy. Her mother gave birth to her at 18 and couldn’t attend college because of it. And Latavia’s former best friend became pregnant at 16.  So a pregnancy prevention program in eighth grade and another in her neighborhood this summer hit home…”

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs

Trump administration cuts short anti-teen pregnancy grants, By Carolyn Thompson (AP), July 25, 2017, ABC News: “Dozens of teen pregnancy prevention programs deemed ineffective by President Donald Trump’s administration will lose more than $200 million in funding following a surprise decision to end five-year grants after only three years. The administration’s assessment is in sharp contrast with that of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which credited the program with contributing to an all-time low rate of teen pregnancies…”

Youth Homelessness

A hidden population: Youth homelessness is on the rise, By Teresa Wiltz, July 7, 2017, Stateline: “They are the nation’s invisible homeless population, undercounted for years, hiding out in cars and abandoned buildings, in motels and on couches, often trading sex for a place to sleep. And now, for a complex variety of reasons, the number of youth — teens and young adults — living on the street appears to be growing…”

Aging Out of Foster Care – Missouri

Creating a safety net for kids aging out of foster care, By Jackie Rehwald, November 5, 2015, Springfield News-Leader: “Shortly after being released from state’s custody at age 18, Suzi Evans used her savings to buy a car. She had no license or insurance. No one was there to tell Evans she was making a mistake, and no one had ever taught her to drive…”

Health Insurance Coverage for Former Foster Youth

Many former foster youths don’t know they have health care, By Ray Glier, October 1, 2015, National Public Radio: “Laticia Aossey was flat on her back in an Iowa hospital bed with a tube up her nose, a needle for a peripheral IV stuck in one arm and monitors pasted to her body. It was early June 2014, a week after her 18th birthday, when a friend brought Aossey’s mail from home — including one ominous letter. Aossey’s health insurance was about to be discontinued…”

Child Poverty in the US

  • The shocking reach of U.S. child poverty, By Aimee Picchi, September 11, 2015, CBS News: “America’s childhood poverty numbers aren’t pretty, but they are even uglier than you might think. Take a snapshot of the U.S. today, and you’ll find that 22 percent of all children live in families that are below the federal poverty level. But what happens when you look at how American children fare throughout their pre-adult lives? It’s nearly twice as bad…”
  • Two in every five U.S. children spend at least a year in poverty, By Nick Timiraos, September 9, 2015, Wall Street Journal: “Childhood poverty is far more prevalent than annual figures suggest, a new paper says, with nearly two in every five U.S. children spending at least one year in poverty before they turn 18 years old. The findings from Caroline Ratcliffe, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, show particularly stark divides along racial lines. Black children fare much worse. Some 75% are poor at some point during their childhood, compared to 30% of white children…”

Inequality and Poverty – Cross-National

How the U.S. compares on income inequality and poverty, By Elizabeth Shell, June 19, 2014, PBS Newshour: “There’s new data on income inequality out from the OECD Thursday, so we thought we’d take a look to see how the U.S. compares against the group’s 33 other countries — and its upcoming World Cup matches (more on that in a bit). When we look at income, the U.S. has had a wider gap — meaning less equal distribution of income — than the OECD average for at least the past 30 years. The data also shows that lower-income households across the OECD were hit harder by the financial crisis — the poor either lost more during the crisis or benefited less from the recovery than did their higher-income neighbors. While real household income hasn’t changed much (stagnated) across the 34 member countries, young adults have been hit the hardest since the financial crisis. . .”