Health Disparities in Appalachia

  • Report: Appalachians’ health ‘dramatically’ poorer than the US as a whole, By Kristi L. Nelson, August 24, 2017, Knoxville News Sentinel: “Heart disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, drug overdose, diabetes, stroke and suicide – they’re all killing Appalachians at a higher rate than the rest of the country as a whole. On Thursday, the Appalachian Regional Commission, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky issued a report, ‘Health Disparities in Appalachia,’ outlining what it called ‘dramatic disparities’ in both health issues and outcomes in the 420-county Appalachian Region, compared to nationwide numbers…”
  • Death comes sooner in Appalachia. It comes much sooner in Eastern Kentucky, By Bill Estep, August 24, 2017, Lexington Herald-Leader: “The years of life Appalachian Kentucky residents lose to health maladies such as heart disease and cancer is 63 percent higher than the national average, according to a report released Thursday. The news was not good in Eastern Kentucky and other parts of Appalachia on just about every indicator of health: heart disease deaths were 17 percent higher in Appalachia than the country as a whole; cancer deaths were 27 percent higher; stroke deaths were 14 percent higher; and the rate of deaths from poisoning, which mostly means from drug overdoses, was 37 percent higher…”

Rich/Poor Health Disparities

U.S. one of world’s worst on health divide between rich, poor, By Sarah Toy, June 7, 2017, USA Today: “The U.S. has one of the world’s largest health disparities between the rich and poor — behind only Chile and Portugal — and its healthcare system and lack of social supports are to blame, experts say. Researchers examining surveys on health and income from people in 32 countries found poor Americans reported worse health than rich U.S. residents in significant numbers…”

Access to Health Care

  • Study of Philly neighborhoods finds big disparities in health-care access by race, By Don Sapatkin, August 9, 2016, Philadelphia Inquirer: “Philadelphia has plenty of primary-care providers overall, but there is far less access to care in communities with the highest concentrations of African American residents, according to a new study.  While the general findings were not a surprise – highly segregated black (and, to a lesser extent, Hispanic) areas were known to have fewer medical practitioners – the difference was bigger than the researchers had expected…”
  • Obamacare is helping more poor patients get to the doctor even as political battles continue, By Noam N. Levey, August 8, 2016, Los Angeles Times: “Even as the Affordable Care Act remains a political flash point, new research shows it is dramatically improving poor patients’ access to medical care in states that have used the law to expand their Medicaid safety net. After just two years of expanded coverage, patients in expansion states are going to the doctor more frequently and having less trouble paying for it.  At the same time, the experience in those states suggests better access will ultimately improve patients’ health, as patients get more regular checkups and seek care for chronic illnesses such diabetes and heart disease…”
  • Obamacare appears to be making people healthier, By Margot Sanger-Katz, August 9, 2016, New York Times: “Obamacare has provided health insurance to some 20 million people. But are they any better off?  This has been the central question as we’ve been watching the complex and expensive health law unfurl. We knew the law was giving people coverage, but information about whether it’s protecting people from debt or helping them become more healthy has been slower to emerge…”

Community Health Profiles – New York City

  • A troubling portrait of Brooklyn’s overall health is released, By Jonathan LaMantia, October 15, 2015, Crain’s New York Business: “The city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Wednesday released the first of its Community Health Profiles, breaking down demographics, poverty and prevention statistics in 18 community districts in Brooklyn. Some of the health care statistics reported included the rates of smoking, obesity and diabetes; the number of uninsured adults and adults who went without needed medical care; rates of vaccinations for diseases such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and the flu; and rates of premature death and infant mortality…”
  • In NYC, new health data zoom in on disparities among areas, By Jennifer Peltz (AP), October 14, 2015, Miami Herald: “In Brooklyn’s impoverished Brownsville neighborhood, the average person can expect to live to 74. Six miles away in lower Manhattan’s financial district, life expectancy is more than 11 years longer. The nation’s biggest city is taking close-up snapshots of the state of health in its neighborhoods, highlighting disparities that officials say show being healthy isn’t just about individual biology…”