Workfare – New York City

De Blasio’s plan to eliminate workfare lifts hopes for job seekers, By Rachel L. Swarns, November 2, 2014, New York Times: “Every workday morning, Phedra Schliefer-Tobias mops floors, cleans toilets and scrubs sinks just like the rest of the members of the custodial staff in a nine-story office building in Lower Manhattan. But her city-issued identification card — her badge of shame — makes it clear that she stands apart.In bold, black letters, the ID card describes her as a “Non Employee,” proof that she is not on a career track. She is a 48-year-old welfare recipient, working for her benefits and “going nowhere,” as she puts it…”

Affordable Housing and Tenant Rights – New York

As New York landlords push buyouts, renters resist, By Mireya Navarro, July 9, 2014, New York Times: “The first offer from the landlord’s representative came in April: Take $90,000 to move out, the tenants said they were told, or the landlord would sue and they would lose their apartments anyway. Lin Thai Ng, who lives in a cramped $500-a-month studio in downtown Manhattan with her husband, said no. The landlord persisted and offered $100,000. After they refused again, the couple got a notice saying they were not the lawful tenants and declaring them squatters. They were told they had 18 days to get out or they would be evicted. . .”

Homelessness – New York City

New York City street homelessness rises 6%, By Michael Howard Saul, June 6, 2014, Wall Street Journal: “The number of homeless people living in New York City public spaces increased 6% in 2014 compared with 2013, according to records released Friday by Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration. An estimated 3,357 people were living on the streets, in city parks and other areas during an annual survey conducted in January, marking an increase of 177 people from January 2013. This year’s estimate showed 1,808 people living in subways, a 2% decrease from the year before. Unsheltered homelessness rose the most in Queens, surging 158%, and on Staten Island, rising 43%, records show. In Manhattan, the borough with the most street homelessness . . .”